Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, 1920-1956

  • 153 Pages
  • 2.77 MB
  • 933 Downloads
  • English
StatementLeo A. Isaac ; an interview conducted by Amelia R. Fry.
SeriesNew York Times oral history program, Forestry, parks and conservation oral history collection ;, no. 23.
ContributionsFry, Amelia R.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 49703 (S)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationxii, 153 leaves
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2903559M
LC Control Number84132330

Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, oral history transcript, by Isaac, Leo A. (Leo Anthony), ; Bancroft Library. Regional Oral History Office; Fry, Amelia RPages: Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, Biodiversity Heritage Library The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

BHL works best with JavaScript enabledAuthor: Leo A. Isaac, Amelia R. Fry, Bancroft Library. NASA Images Solar System Collection Ames Research Center Brooklyn Museum Full text of " Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, oral history transcript, ".

New book details world-wide research on Douglas-fir. CORVALLIS, Ore. -- The Pacific Northwest's iconic Douglas-fir tree rivals coast redwood for honors as the world's tallest tree. It isn't a true fir - the species that was named for Scottish botanist David Douglas is, however, the mostly widely distributed North American conifer.

Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, By Leo A. (Leo Anthony) Isaac, Amelia R. Fry and Bancroft Library. Regional Oral History Office. Topics: Douglas fir, Forest service. The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, View Metadata. By: Isaac, Leo A. (Leo Anthony), - Fry, Amelia R. - Bancroft Library. Douglas fir Lumber trade.

present in the two States aboutacres of Douglas fir second growth on cut -over lands. Over half of this 5, acres is pri- vately owned. A survey made in by the Forest Service on 5, acres of national forests within the Douglas fir zone showed 2, acres of Douglas fir under years old.

From this survey. Douglas-fir is the name of an entire genus of trees that contains six species--two native to North America and four native to eastern Asia.

Because of its similarity to other genera, Douglas-fir has given botanists fits. It has, at various times, been called a pine, a spruce, a hemlock, and a true fir.

Structure of early old-growth Douglas-fir forests in the Pacific Northwest Article in Forest Ecology and Management –25 January with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Douglas-ir (Psuosuga menziesii (Mirb.) and revised n ndsi­ the natural stand and the plntation were Franc.) and a better understaning of re­ mrzed yields from 2, plos n nat­ grown on a. Now Nisbet turns his attention to David Douglas, the premier botanical explorer in the Pacific Northwest and throughout other areas of western North Americ Jack Nisbet first told the story of British explorer David Thompson, who mapped the Columbia River, in his acclaimed book Sources of the River, which set the standard for research and narrative /5(67).

Description Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, 1920-1956 PDF

Veneer Recovery from Second-growth Douglas-fir Volume of USDA Forest Service research paper PNW: Author: Thomas Daniel Fahey: Contributor: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.) Publisher: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S.

Department of Agriculture, Original from: University of. of Douglas-Fir In the Pacific Northwest By Norman P. Worthington and George R. Staebler Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Eperiment Staion Technical Buletin No.

Download Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, 1920-1956 FB2

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE • FOREST SERVICE January For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Govement Printing Oice Washing D.C.-Price 40 cnts. The fire history of Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests is varied and complex because Douglas-fir exists in a variety of forest types over a wide range of environments.

Details Douglas fir research in the Pacific Northwest, 1920-1956 FB2

Douglas-fir has been dominant over this region because of disturbance by fire and the species' adaptations to fire. Even-aged stands of Douglas-fir allow the fungus to build up, releasing spores that spread with the wind.

It's text book conservation biology that something like this would happen to the Pacific Northwest's forests -- scientists have been warning of the dangers of poor forest management and planting monocultures of Douglas Fir for years.

“Doug Deur invites us to discover the taste and history of the Northwest.” —Spencer B. Beebe, author of Cache and founder of Ecotrust The Pacific Northwest offers a veritable feast for foragers, and with Douglas Deur as your trusted guide you will learn how to safely find and identify an abundance of delicious wild plants/5().

Fire Ecology of Pacific Northwest Forests is a historical, analytical, and ecological approach to the effects and use of fire in Pacific Northwest wildlands. James K. Agee, a leading expert in the emerging field of fire ecology, analyzes the ecological role of fire in the creation and maintenance of the natural forests common to most of the.

Get this from a library. Growth and yield records from well-stocked stands of Douglas-fir: a summary of data and analyses resulting from the oldest permanent growth plots in the Pacific Northwest. [Richard L Williamson; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)].

More editions of Douglas Fir Research in the Pacific Northwest, ; Oral History Transcript, Douglas Fir Research in the Pacific Northwest, ; Oral History Transcript, ISBN () Softcover, General Books LLC, Carlos Arnaldo Schwantes is a professor in the Department of History, and director of the Institute for Pacific Northwest Study, at the University of Idaho.

He is the author of a number of books, including "Hard Traveling: A Portrait of Work Life in the New Northwest" (Nebraska ).

David Douglas, a Naturalist at Work is a colorfully illustrated collection of essays that examines various aspects of Douglas's career, demonstrating the connections between his work in the Pacific Northwest of the 19th century and the place we know today.

From the Columbia River's perilous bar to luminous blooms of mountain wildflowers; from /5(16). Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii, also known as Coast Douglas-fir, Pacific Douglas-fir, Oregon pine, or Douglas spruce, is an evergreen conifer native to western North America from west-central British Columbia, Canada southward to central California, United Oregon and Washington its range is continuous from the Cascades crest west to the Pacific Coast Ranges and Pacific : Tracheophytes.

Tradeoffs in Timber, Carbon, and Cash Flow under Alternative Management Systems for Douglas-Fir in the Pacific Northwest by David D. Diaz 1,2,*, Sara Loreno 2, Gregory J.

Ettl 1 and Brent Davies 2Cited by: 3. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 63 () Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Contrasting microclimates among clearcut, edge, and interior of old-growth Douglas-fir forest Jiquan Chena, Jerry F. Franklin" and Thomas A. Spiesb "College of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, WAUSA bForest Science Laboratory, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Cited by:   David Douglas, a Naturalist at Work: An Illustrated Exploration Across Two Centuries in the Pacific Northwest.

During a meteoric career that spanned from toDavid Douglas made the first systematic collections of flora and fauna over many parts of the greater Pacific Northwest/5. Site index curves for Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest by King, James E.; 1 edition; First published in ; Subjects: Douglas fir, Forests and forestry, Site index (Forestry).

The coast Douglas-fir variety is the dominant tree west of the Cascade Mountains in the Pacific Northwest, occurring in nearly all forest types, competes well on most parent materials, aspects, and slopes.

Adapted to a moist, mild climate, it grows larger and faster than Rocky Mountain : Pinopsida. Douglas-fir forests of the coastal Pacific Northwest experience yearly summer droughts; however, the variation in shallow soil available water supply throughout the region is not well understood nor is the effect of future climate change.

Soil moisture sensors were installed in 60 Douglas-fir Cited by: 1. Jack Nisbet first told the story of British explorer David Thompson, who mapped the Columbia River, in his acclaimed book Sources of the River, which set the standard for research and narrative biography for the region.

Now Nisbet turns his attention to David Douglas, the premier botanical explorer in the Pacific Northwest and throughout other areas of western North America. Hardcover print copies (black & white with a color cover) are available for a limited time at $45 each (including shipping) in the U.S., and $65 each (including shipping) internationally.

Email [email protected] for more information. Please write "Douglas-fir book. Early forestry research: a history of the Pacific Northwest Forest & Range Experiment Station, by Ivan Doig (Book); The forester's almanac, by Or.)Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland (Book).Douglas-fir has been introduced as an ornamental tree in arboreta and parks since From the end of the 19 th century it was planted at a progressive rate in the forests of var - ious European countries, especially after the second world war.Limited tree size variation in coastal Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.)Franco) plantations makes them susceptible to developing high height to diameter ratios (H/D same units) in the dominant H/D of a tree is a relative measure of stability under wind and snow loads.

Experimental plot data from three large studies was used to Cited by: